Say What?

Melville House blogs this post about Indie books that may, or may not be, bestsellers.

The quarter of sales they site [sic] here is referring to total sales, which gives us no information about the total revenue. Self-published titles are likely to be marked in a lower price range, beginning at ninety-nine cents. So while this is a great campaign to appeal to authors interested in self-publishing, there’s no information for authors about the bottom line.

I’d say that quote is just as problematic as the problem cited.

Except the blogger wonders “A Quarter of What?” when right below is the explanation: “A Quarter of the Top 100 books on Amazon are Indie-published.” I don’t think Amazon was saying that Indie titles are responsible for a quarter of the revenue. Amazon is saying that of the top 100 books on Amazon, 25 of them were Indie published.

She goes on to say this:

So while this is a great campaign to appeal to authors interested in self-publishing, there’s no information for authors about the bottom line.

OK, look, I don’t get why this is so hard for those in traditional publishing to grasp. Maybe it’s because they know the statements they send to authors are pretty close to impenetrable when an author wants to know how she’s doing. But really, when I see my self-published income, I know exactly what the book cost me to put out, and I know the percentage Amazon (and other vendors) are paying me. And guess what? I have no problem figuring out whether I’m making more self-publishing or traditionally publishing.

None at all.

Share

Tags:

Comments are closed.